20/Resource Set Specification Version 1

This specification defines the version 1 format of the resource-set representation or R in short.

  • Name: github.com/flux-framework/rfc/spec_20.rst

  • Editor: Dong H. Ahn <ahn1@llnl.gov>

  • State: Raw

Language

The key words “MUST”, “MUST NOT”, “REQUIRED”, “SHALL”, “SHALL NOT”, “SHOULD”, “SHOULD NOT”, “RECOMMENDED”, “MAY”, and “OPTIONAL” in this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119.

Overview

Flexible resource representation is important for some of the key components of Flux. Resource requests are part of Flux jobspec, described in RFC 14. This RFC describes the format of a concrete resource-set representation referred to as R, constructed by the scheduler in response to a resource request. R is input to the remote execution system, which uses information expressed in R to establish containment, binding, mapping, and execution of program tasks, apportioned across broker ranks. As a program terminates, the execution system releases shards of the original R, eventually adding up to its union, back to the scheduler. Finally, when a Flux instance launches a child instance, R is passed down from the enclosing instance to the child instance, where it primes the child scheduler with a block of allocatable resources.

Design Goals

The R format is designed with the following goals:

  • Allow the resource data conformant to our resource model (RFC 4) to be serialized and deserialized with no data loss;

  • Express the resource allocation information to the program execution service (RFC 8);

  • Use the same format to release a resource subset of R to the scheduler;

  • Allow the consumers of R to deserialize an R object while minimizing the parsing complexity and the data to read;

Producers and Consumers

  • The scheduler for a Flux instance (or instance scheduler) uses this format to serialize each resource allocation as REQUIRED by the instance program execution service and OPTIONALLY REQUIRED by child scheduler instances.

  • The instance scheduler deserializes an R object to build its internal resource data used for scheduling.

  • Users MAY manually write an R object for testing and debugging.

  • User-facing utilities that query a resource status (e.g., what resources are available or idle, or what resources are allocated to a job) MAY use an R object to extract this information;

  • The program execution service emits a valid R object to release a resource subset of an R to the instance scheduler.

Resource Set Format Definition

The JSON documents that conform to the R format SHALL be referred to as R JSON documents or in short R documents. An R JSON document SHALL consist of a dictionary with four keys: version, execution, scheduling and attributes. It SHALL be valid if and only if it contains the version key and either or both the execution and scheduling keys. The value of the execution key SHALL contain sufficient data for the execution system to perform its core tasks. The value of scheduling SHALL contain sufficient data for schedulers. Finally, the value of attributes SHALL provide optional information including but not being limited to data specific to the scheduler used to create this JSON document.

Version

The value of the version key SHALL contain 1 to indicate the format version.

Execution

The value of the execution key SHALL contain at least the keys R_lite, and nodelist, with optional keys starttime and expiration. Other keys are reserved for future extensions.

R_lite is a strict list of dictionaries each of which SHALL contain at least the following two keys:

rank

The value of the rank key SHALL be a string list of broker rank identifiers in idset format (See RFC 22). This list SHALL indicate the broker ranks to which other information in the current entry applies.

children

The children key encodes the information about certain compute resources contained within this compute node. The value of this key SHALL contain a dictionary with two keys: core and gpu. Other keys are reserved for future extensions.

core

The core key SHALL contain a logical compute core IDs string in RFC 22 idset format.

gpu

The OPTIONAL gpu key SHALL contain a logical GPU IDs string in RFC 22 idset format.

The nodelist key SHALL be an array of hostnames which correspond to the rank entries of the R_lite dictionary, and serves as a mapping of R_lite rank entries to hostname. Each entry in nodelist MAY contain a string in RFC 29 Hostlist Format, e.g. host[0-16].

The execution key MAY also contain any of the following optional keys:

starttime

The value of the starttime key, if present, SHALL encode the start time at which the resource set is valid. The value SHALL be the number of seconds elapsed since the Unix Epoch (1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC) with optional microsecond precision. If starttime is unset, then the resource set has no specified start time and is valid beginning at any time up to expiration.

expiration

The value of the expiration key, if present, SHALL encode the end or expiration time of the resource set in seconds since the Unix Epoch, with optional microsecond precision. If starttime is also set, expiration MUST be greater than starttime. If expiration is unset, the resource set has no specified end time and is valid beginning at starttime without expiration.

Scheduling

The scheduling key allows RFC4-compliant schedulers to serialize any subset of graph resource data into its value and later deserialize this value with no data loss. The scheduling key contains a dictionary with a single key: graph. Other keys are reserved for future extensions. The graph key SHALL conform to the latest version of the JSON Graph Format (JGF). Thus, its value is a dictionary with two keys, nodes and edges, that encode the resource vertices and edges as described in RFC 4.

Graph Vertices

The value of the nodes key defined in JGF is a strict list of graph vertices. Each list member is a vertex that contains two keys: id and metadata. The id key SHALL contain a unique string ID for the containing vertex. The value of the metadata key is a dictionary that encodes the resource pool data described in RFC 4. Thus, this dictionary SHALL contain the following keys to describe the base data of a resource pool:

  • type

  • uuid

  • basename

  • name

  • id

  • properties

  • size

  • unit

It MAY contain other OPTIONAL resource vertex data.

Graph Edges

The value of the edges key defined in JGF SHALL be a strict list of graph edges. Each list element SHALL be an edge that connects two graph vertices and contains the source, target and metadata keys. The value of the source key SHALL contain the ID of the source graph vertex. The value of the target key SHALL contain the ID of the target graph vertex. The value of this metadata key SHALL contain a dictionary that encodes the resource subsystem and relationship data for the containing edge as described in RFC 4. It SHALL contain two keys:

subsystem

The value of the subsystem key SHALL be a string that indicates a specific subsystem to which this edge belongs. (e.g., containment or power subsystems).

relationship

The value of the relationship key SHALL be a string that indicates a relationship between the source and target resource vertices. The relationship SHALL only be defined within the subsystem defined above. (e.g., “contains” relationship within the “containment” subsystem).

Attributes

The purpose of the attributes key is to provide optional information on this R document. The attributes key SHALL be a dictionary of one key: system. Other keys are reserved for future extensions.

system Attributes in the system dictionary provide additional system information that have affected the creation of this R document. All of the system attributes are optional.

A common system attribute is:

scheduler The value of the scheduler is a free-from dictionary that may provide the information specific to the scheduler used to produce this document. For example, a scheduler that manages multiple job queues may add queue=batch to indicate that this resource set was allocated from within its batch queue.

References

JSON Graph Format Github, Anthony Bargnesi, et al., Visited Jan. 2019